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20121201
20121231
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commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
perot. john mccain. they tend to lose. a was pleased to see bob dole back on the senate floor last week. but bob dole rhymes with a lot of things. but to have bad names for rhyming this sounds easy because it rhymes with tusche but when george w. bush left office i wanted to write a poem i had a lot of middle names. it was a do to you george herbert walker of and never treasured as a talker your predicates were prone to wander down to less off alone. [laughter] so on your greenwich country day relax in never ordered japanese. clinton is a bad name. and in his second term with the unpleasant nests remember when hillary clinton said to take a lead she would appear on the today program and clinton would not work so i was forced to use the native name. the name of origen. or the slave name. it was up to hillary rodham to prove that his house is not sodom. [laughter] but obama of the jokes of his name it was a good name to rhyme but unfortunately i use them with osama bin london clap your mom up. so i get worried when they talk about presidential candidates i did a similar book in 2008 calle
there are but to the regulations favor and how they impact everybody else. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. bob in marina, california is the next caller. >> it is an honor to talk to you. i met you and some years back at the conference in monterey, california and i remember the educational challenges not only to reach the masses but also to educator the children of the superrich and that the blacks on route nadir at observation the only the superrich can save us. i would like to get an update on your take of the educational challenge we face by your analysis which i think is absolutely superb. you are really a beacon of light in the darkness for us all. >> host: >> guest: education is our biggest challenge, drive economic growth and we have an educational system that works on a model developed at the university of bologna in the year 800 where a guy stands in front of a rule of 800 and talk with them. and into every classroom using video and the internet. we need to recognize and education assistance designed for an agrarian era and give kids the summer of doesn't make sense and an educational system des
the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does it to win votes. bob jones had just moved, just moved his university and thurmond needed votes in south carolina. had lost in 1950 race for the senate to johnson, larger on the strength of votes he didn't win in the up country. that began a long process, a long relationship of thurmond with conservatives fundamentalists and evangelicals who are looking to get involved in the political process. so we need to understand thurmond's racial politics in the mix of these other conservative causes, these conservative issues that he was very involved in. and to see how they intersect with one another. and i think doing so gives us the history of what strom thurmond's america looks like, and else is rethink not only was going on in the south but was going on in the national conservative political realm as well. rethink and strom thurmond helps us think modern conservatism to a history i think that is too often thurmond is left out of because we only remember him as this kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. let me read you, an excerpt
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
at it and speaking of coming back at it, we have a second bite of the apple for bob. >> we are familiar with statistics that the u.s. spends significantly more percentage of gnp on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. what i was surprised to hear at a recent conference was exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups for seniors and people with disabilities or things like this. which raises the question in my mind would it be better for us to rebalance our spending in this direction to provide better quality by providing support services that allow people to stay in their homes functioning well instead of institutionalizing them which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens because it makes no sense. we know it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much kind of support structure is a very large one. i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized in long-term ca
with muslims. we talk a lot about my friend, reverend bob roberts, a southern baptist preacher who during the ground zero time, they win on went out on a limb with how supportive they were. bob roberts in deep red texas started reading matt 10 things i love about muslims. ten things i admire about islam. and i thought, why are you doing this? and he said, i am a christian, as is what i have to do. you people are in trouble, and i have to stand up for you. so i find that wonderful and he built a civic bridge with me, based on the inspiration of this tradition. that kind of stuff is going on a little bit below the radar screen. a little bit behind the scenes in both campaigns. i think it is a broadly positive thing for america. >> what you think is the biggest roadblock that your organization or interface groups are facing today? what do you think are one or two things that people can help about with relieving those were boxed. >> that's a great question, thank you for that. her questions i always ask my friend antiperspirant one of you take this one first, a quick answer. >> deepest fear t
with how supportive they were of muslims, but bob roberts in deep red texas started tweeting 10 things i love about muslims. 10 things i admire it about islam. and i'm like, why are you doing this? he's like, i'm a christian come this is what i got to do. your people are in trouble and i've got to stand up for you. so i find a, i disagree with bob on just about everything, but he built a civic bridge with me based on the aspiration of his tradition. and i kind of stuff i think again is going on a little bit below the radar screen, although the behind the scenes in both campaigns, and i think it's a broadly positive thing for america. >> what do you think is the biggest roadblock that your organization or interfaith groups are facing today? and what do you think are one or two solutions that people in this room can help with removing those roadblocks? >> what a great question, thank you for that. ed, do you want to, hard questions i always asked my friends to answer first and so why did you take this one first. it will give me a chance to think about it. [laughter] >> the deepest answer i
, the 63rd annual. [inaudible conversations] >> now joining us here is bob minzesheimer. i'm going to get you over here. you have the better light. i don't need to worry about that. how important are the national book awards in your view? >> well in the book world? very important. probably not quite as important as the pulitzers, but they're second to the pulitzer's, the most prestigious award, and they're trying to make them more of a cultural phenomenon. look the booker award thursday britain. >> do you comment on the finalists? >> well, i did -- i've always believed -- this is a strange thing. in britain, the bookies -- betting is legal in britain, and bookize set odd on the booker awards. we have nothing like that. and i thought, we should. try to make books more part of the popular culture. so my two predictions -- and i'm guessing because the judges or five people. each panel is five judges. five predictions that kevin powers, who has written a debut novel set in iraq, yellow bird, will be an upset in fiction, and an sold standby, robert caro, who has been on chance many tames, his
where bob jones university lost its tax exemption because the court argued there was a compelling interest in not having the state collaborate with racism. very similarly they should collaborate with the oppression of women but a practice of pauley emery, what would the objection to that be? of course administratively impossible because it creates so many layers of families and former families but in our legal tradition administrative difficulty has to be really extreme to be compelling state interest. one case i know of that trumped the religious interest was a case where an american family refused to allow their child to have a social security, they said that was so fundamental in an organized society, it turns out she had already been given one anyway so the case was very odd in that respect. that shows you that you have to go far out on a limb to trump the religious claim. u.s. about reynolds. reynolds is a case in the 1870s where a polygamous mormon man lost, the first case to test the free exercise clause because it was not applied to state law yet and therefore only the ter
appstore is one of the best things about this. >>host: i have heard of that (...) >>guest: it is not bob's appstore. >>host: do they have some good things? >>caller: in fact 22 million. >>host: tell them about the free stuff! >>guest: there are 1.2 million books you can buy but millions literally of books that are free. alyce carone made me laugh, she said her father uses a candle and she says what book did you buy? he said why would i ever get a book? there is millions for free. --uses a can pole. public domain books are free. --kindle we are sending you with what comes along along with your stylus anti- earbuds and simply to impress $25 certificate, we are giving you a month free of amazon- prime. --and the earbuds. there is 180,000 books like the harry potter series is part of that 180,000 books. you can borrow them for for using amazon-primetown of movie is also an tv series. cynthia mentioned down at the iman ago, i do not know if that is one of them.w down abbya moment ago. if all you wanted to do download free applications, music, magazines you could certainly do that. but
spent on friday about an hour with bob kerrey. bob kerrey and i reflected back on his experience here in the senate and one memorable meeting that he and i had. and the purpose of that meeting was for bob kerrey to introduce me to the presiding officer. and it was a wonderful meeting because when the meeting finished -- i won't go into detail on everything i said but the presiding officer knows -- i came out of that meeting recognizing how what kindred spirits these two gallant warriors are and were. both having been highly decorated, one in the navy, the other a marine. one medal of honor, the other -- the presiding officer -- navy cross, silver star, more than one bronze star for valor, a number of purple hearts. as i said again, but i can't say it too much, what an honor and pleasure it has been to serve in this body with the senator from virginia, jim webb. i've learned so much about what difference a positive attitude will make. no better example of that is the new g.i. bill of rights. to think that a new senator, a brand-new senator would have the idea, the confidence that i can
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
of staff -- n timely dr me, care are garland, bob vanhuevland, wally, my legislative director who was with me for more than 20 years, tom mar, jerry gaginas, we all fondly call "mom," because she cracks the whip and makes sure the trains run on time. mary naylor, also has been with me more than 20 years. my deputies there, john rider and joel friedman, who have done extraordinary work on behalf of the people of this country. stew nagerka, who is going to help me with charts today, my longtime communication communics director, and so many more. and most  of all to my family, my wife lucy, who has been my partner through all this, was my campaign manager when i first ran for the united states senate, my daughter jessie, who in in many ways has perhaps sacrificed the most because when you're in this job, you miss birthdays, you miss other important events. but she has been a great daughter, and she was here last night for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small farm tawld tipping tree farm. we wish t
provide greater efficiencies. we were able -- bob gates before me begin that effort, achieved about, i believe about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that, in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now, and i asked, i asked that question when he first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary, vis-À-vis the service chief? and the reality is that there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. but having said that, there are a hell of a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon, and we will. >> as the defense department deals with the downsizing the services, have you considered cuts to the number of flag and general officers? >> you know, again i think, i think that's part and parcel of, as you do force reduct
that in this country should never have a situation. >> great examples. >> we had a great team headed by bob and courtney who are real heroes. we have a good system to track what we're seeing. just break down what we saw on election day. about 32% of the issues we saw were related to ballot shortages and capacity issues. basically lack of resources. 20% came from the overuse of provisional ballots. we were saying this over and over again when it should not, voters should not have been given a provisional ballot but were. a lot of that was about training. a lot of it was about misunderstanding. 16% of the problems with oversight issues. machine problems, polls opening late, different issues with the actual site. then the rest all in single digits have do with a bunch of other things. and we were sitting issues here and there, and we don't just see don't just see the election date anymore as election day. we see it as early voting time. a lot of these issues we saw leading up to election day, and thankfully and lawsuits that have girly but we were able to address those issues far in advance wh
took it as a personal question you could almost see interface to redress that she and bob dole have never had a child. she said we'd never have children. it was really just an abstract kind of question. the next day the media said she's not ready for the campaign trail because she's not talking like a kennedy. she's talking to this person away. all of a sudden within three weeks, her campaign had folded. i think michael dukakis problem in terms of presidential debates that he was asked whether he would do, he gave a lawyerly and their, a defense of his opposition to capital punishment. all of a sudden we said this and this guy have a human side of all? it's one of those things we see into the capabilities of the year of the individual. al gore because those he's been pointed out as the serial exaggerator. any one of those stories you could explain away he'd never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create the internet. and then to have the perception of being in a laboratory and doing it. he was support creative creating the arpanet, but he had that story in a story tha
the fiscal cliff. senator bob corker also spoke to reporters. >> good morning. i am lamar alexander. this is my colleague bob corker. merry christmas to you three points to make and then i would like to introduce cementer corker. here is the first point. when the dust settles and everything is said and done, federal individual income taxes are not going to go up on almost all americans next year. that needs to be settled this weekend by the votes and after the first of the year, so that's the most important point for americans to know. for almost all americans when the dust settles taxes, individual income taxes won't be going up next year. all the talk is about taxes but what we should talk about today is the medicare fiscal clef, the looming bankruptcy in the program that seniors depend upon to pay the medical bills for the millions of americans who are counting the days until they are eligible for medicare so they can afford the medicare bill, it would be a tragedy if when they get to that day there isn't enough money to pay the bills but according to the medicare trustees that d
it up to the mid-30s. bob dole, in the middest of the sentiment in fact 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the imagine irk 40% that carl thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing the questions. you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino vote moving a million-two, a million-three, you know, what the turnout is is we don't really know yet. it will take awhile. the exit poll numbers lose credibility as time goes on, but i don't want to get too geeky with you, but say, you know, shift of a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid-30s in terms of the share saying that was a good night for republicans. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states? i know you were going to ask. [laughter] >> then i want to go down the road. >> it's interesting because it doesn't -- it would have -- if the exit polls were correct, which is insent, shifted 10% of the vote out of obama's column on romney's column, romney would have squeaked florida. clearly,
in the state. >> anybody want to comment? >> go ahead. >> i agree. with everything you said, bob. i think that we need more portability in registration and seeking ways we can get that person to a regular ballot. i think that's a problem, the provisional ballot whether it's the poll workers needing better access to database and making sure the election officials have enough phone lines for the poll workers to work with. it seemed to be dave connect when voters show up at improper locations, and then of course the folks say we should be doing everything we can could count every bullate -- every ballot. there's michigan that prevent someone from verifying the ballot and no reason states should be resisting that. >> i think you're totally right on, this statewide portability issue. that was juan of the most cynical laws i saw passed in 2010 and 2011. it wasn't solving any problem to say you had to reregister when you move and there's no reason you should have to do that. in addition, in early vote, there's no reason we can't systems in place where you can vote anywhere in a county. and in oh
to trade through competitive venues and clearing houses. >> thank you. let me ask mr. bob a question regarding the inner affiliate swaps. can you speak to how the cftc ruled compared to a bill that we had come to h.r. 2779 and whether you think that margin in turn enhances the markup for inner affiliate swaps because i'm thinking of companies in my jurisdictions who have really indicated to me that inner affiliate trade is the credit risk really is not very. it's just a book entry or central risk and hedging purposes. so, can you tell me how the cftc's rule would apply? >> sure. you're absolutely right, congresswoman moore. this is an important issue in your bill is still needed. now the cftc proposed rule is helpful. there's no question they have created an exception for enter affiliate swaps that applies to nonfinancial end-users. the problem is there are two key issues, two problems not addressed by the cftc will. everyone, nonfinancial end-users have an eight step process or a criteria process financial users must meet and what criteria is posting margin between affiliates. again
during world war ii, where he met phil hart and bob dole. and can you imagine those three great men coming together serving our country, wounded, doing rehabilitation at a hospital together in michigan and all going on to be involved in public service as united states senators. that building is still standing. it is no longer a hospital. it's another federal building. it's our great honor in michigan to have that building named the hart dole inouye federal center honoring all three of these outstanding leaders. senator inouye was a great mentor for me as well as so many of us in the senate. coming to the senate always encouraging me, during the elections always telling me to hang in there and theupbgdz would -- things would go well and it would be great. always the person with the smile on his face encouraging each and every one of us. he was there encouraging me when we were fighting for our economic lives in michigan with the automobile industry saying it was going to be okay, we'd be able to get through it and that things would be better on the other side. and he was right. with
to many of you called the criterion by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book on this real first behind the scenes book. the theme of the book with all the justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand warren burger. they thought he was a pompous. that sort of contentiousness is in the rule more than the exception in the history of the supreme court. i don't know how many of you have had the misfortune to hear that justice is served from 1914 to 1941 name james mcreynolds, who such an appalling anti-semite ditties stick it a family whenever justice cardozo would speak. a cantankerous one summer had a car accident and drove his car off a cliff in the first question of who inhabit the corba service felix frankfurter at the time they hated each other so much they thought the frankfurter might've driven him off. [laughter] i was hoping a teacher and a list that i would find this cd center of the rehnquist court and the history. to my great disappointments of the journalists, but so much satisfaction as a citizen, i went rehnquist is very popular among his colleagues. he basic
to several ways but what if that not so? would've governor bob, president elect romney decides it's not how he wishes to govern wallcovering and the motive is first 22 years when he was governor of massachusetts. they uniformly said they be disappointed and one of the stars at the tea party freshman class he's teaching them about says it will be an insurrection. people seemed generally boisterous. you say nothing at. the president promised us not behave like a conservative, it's going to be the death of the republican party, but were going to burn it down. >> and is going to let that sit there for a second, but that's the great and am then asked the next question. let's come back to the leadership. specifically as individuals in a threesome with a do or do not work together, boehner, cantor and mccarthy. characteristic uninsured and beginning the speaker boehner. >> john boehner is a washington my friend was not obvious choice to leave the tea party class. nonetheless he could be the tea party phenomenon for the freight train that was then elected to be on the train rather than underneath i
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
up to the mid 30s. ronald reagan brought it up to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping-off point for neutralizing all these questions. so, you know, how -- we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino votes, moving a million two, million three, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is we don't really know yet. it's going the take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> john king. >> geeky with you. yeah. [laughter] but the shift of a million voters, million and a half voters and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share. and everybody would have said that was a pretty good night for a republican. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row to get everyone. >> it's interesting, because it d
by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dole was the first one to use the first so-called filling the tree. used it seven times. senator byrd, who never used it, that gag rule to stop the minority from offering amendments, i guess, was disappointed he hadn't thought of it so he found a way to use it three times as he was the majority leader. senator mitchell used it three times, senator lott 11, senator daschle only once this gag rule, senator frist 15. all of those leaders used it 40 times. our majority leader, senator reid has used it 68. so we can all come up with statistics on both sides, but shouldn't we just resolve that what we would like to do, show the country that we're grown-up, responsible adults and we can sit down and say, yes, we can agree on ways to make sure that most bills come to the floor and senators get to offer most of the amendments that they want to offer on the bill? i think we can do that. i think there's a spirit on both sides of the aisle to do that, and i'm working toward that goal, and i know a number of democrats and republicans are d
bob barnett, who is the agent of senators and house members who write books and also cab net members and presidents, and we said -- and also cabinet members and presidents. and we said, you know, we'd like to get together and write a book and h we immediately got togethr and wrote a book. and she got a writer who went to each of us and interviewed us and wrote our stories, which were in our own words, and we got together and decided to give all of the proceeds to the girl scouts of america, which was a common organization that had affected almost every one of the women at the time. girl scouts giving leadership capabilities to the girls in our country and i've been a girl scout, barb had been a girl scout. so our book is still in print, and it has raised tens of thousands -- if not hundreds of thousands -- of dollars for the girl scouts to continue their leadership programs. and it all came from something that we learned about each other. and i think that the multiple myeloma, which my brother has and which geraldine fe ferraro , was another area in which barbara and i boun bonded, a
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
considering. now, even some democrats have been open to this idea. according to bob woodward's book, "the price of politics," the white house was willing to look at changing the c.i.p. as part of the so-called grand bargain last year. the simpson-bowles commission included it as one of their solutions. the president himself reportedly had a version of chained c.i.p. in his latest offer on the fiscal cliff. madam president, that's progress. it shows that some democrats are open to serious ideas and real solutions. because we need to do something to relieve the burden of washington's crushing debt, this is something to consider. more revenue is going to have to be part of the solution and republicans have said so. substantial cuts in spending must be part of the answer as well washington does noav problem, ia spending problem. that problem is centered on entitlement programs that are growing far too quickly. switching to the chained c.p.i. is a reasonable first step that we could take now to start to rein in washington's out-of-control spending so that we can save and protect social securit
of the n.s.a., general alexand alexander, with bob mueller at the f.b.i. we've had eric holder appear before the committee to discuss this. and we have heard from intelligence community professionals involved in carrying out surveillance operations, the lawyers who review these operations and, importantly, the inspectors general who carry out oversight of the program and have written reports and letters to the congress with the results of that report. i'd like to just show that classified letter, if i might. it's classified -- i can't read it to you -- but i just want to make that available -- members know that if they want to read the i.g. letter on why what senator wyden is asking for cannot be done, please, before you vote, go to our skiff and read the letter. i don't happen to have it here but as soon as somebody brings it, i will waive it for a -- i will wave it for a moment so that you see it. the committee's review of f.a.a. surveillance authorities have included the receipt and examination of dozens of reports concerning the implementation of these authorities over the past fo
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
for broad conversation. so with that let me know who is here with us the chief staff to governor bob macdonald and from the state of oklahoma where she is the chief of staff to governor mario and at the end, roxanne white joining us from the great state of colorado where she is the chief of staff to governor john hickenlooper. they are all professionals in their career. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and then we will come down this way. >> thank you for the report. it provides a good framework for all of us to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform and colorado. our pension is about 69% solvent. we did a major reform in the last administration and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%, and so to give you a sense of how far they were beyond the state if the battle was whether or not the state has a right to ratchet down the cola for our state employees that we could see the need to go to 25% compensation by 2020, so it's very important that we are able to give you the litigation in terms
and keep your question as brief as you can. >> yes, bob with british medical journal. most of the talk it's been about impact on the federal budget and balancing one versus another. what analysis has been done on the exchanges, on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? by hypothesis would be that they would make them less employable in some ways. either that, or takes away from employers providing insurance. on the consumer side, how is it that these increased costs affect access to care and quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that any of the medicare eligibility age would increase where employers would not offer coverage at all. for the vast majority of them, employers outside of industries where retiree health plans are highly concentrated, in fact the medicare eligibility age would be large in some employees would continue in the workforce longer because of the subsidies
. david herring, kent hall, who died on timely death working for me, care are garland, bob vanhuevland, wally, my legislative director who was with me for more than 20 years, tom mar, jerry gaginas, we all fondly call "mom," because she cracks the whip and makes sure the trains run on time. mary naylor, also has been with me more than 20 years. my deputies there, john rider and joel friedman, who have done extraordinary work on behalf of the people of this country. stew nagerka, who is going to help me with charts today, my longtime communication communics director, and so many more. and most  of all to my family, my wife lucy, who has been my partner through all this, was my campaign manager when i first ran for the united states senate, my daughter jessie, who in in many ways has perhaps sacrificed the most because when you're in this job, you miss birthdays, you miss other important events. but she has been a great daughter, and she was here last night for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small far
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